Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Prayer, Fasting, Mercy: "These Three are One."


This sermon is by St. Peter Chrysologus (c. 380 -- c.450), bishop of Ravenna. It is a wonder of beauty, economy, and insight. Use it as a guide for your Lenten journey and you won't go wrong:

There are three things, my brethren, by which faith stands firm, devotion remains constant, and virtue endures. They are prayer, fasting and mercy. Prayer knocks at the door, fasting obtains, mercy receives. Prayer, mercy and fasting: these three are one, and they give life to each other.

           Fasting is the soul of prayer, mercy is the lifeblood of fasting. Let no one try to separate them; they cannot be separated. If you have only one of them or not all together, you have nothing. So if you pray, fast; if you fast, show mercy; if you want your petition to be heard, hear the petition of others. If you do not close your ear to others you open God’s ear to yourself.

           When you fast, see the fasting of others. If you want God to know that you are hungry, know that another is hungry. If you hope for mercy, show mercy. If you look for kindness, show kindness. If you want to receive, give. If you ask for yourself what you deny to others, your asking is a mockery.

Let this be the pattern for all men when they practise mercy: show mercy to others in the same way, with the same generosity, with the same promptness, as you want others to show mercy to you.

           Therefore, let prayer, mercy and fasting be one single plea to God on our behalf, one speech in our defence, a threefold united prayer in our favour.

           Let us use fasting to make up for what we have lost by despising others. Let us offer our souls in sacrifice by means of fasting. There is nothing more pleasing that we can offer to God, as the psalmist said in prophecy: A sacrifice to God is a broken spirit; God does not despise a bruised and humbled heart.

           Offer your soul to God, make him an oblation of your fasting, so that your soul may be a pure offering, a holy sacrifice, a living victim, remaining your own and at the same time made over to God. Whoever fails to give this to God will not be excused, for if you are to give him yourself you are never without the means of giving.

           To make these acceptable, mercy must be added. Fasting bears no fruit unless it is watered by mercy. Fasting dries up when mercy dries up. Mercy is to fasting as rain is to earth. However much you may cultivate your heart, clear the soil of your nature, root out vices, sow virtues, if you do not release the springs of mercy, your fasting will bear no fruit.

           When you fast, if your mercy is thin your harvest will be thin; when you fast, what you pour out in mercy overflows into your barn. Therefore, do not lose by saving, but gather in by scattering. Give to the poor, and you give to yourself. You will not be allowed to keep what you have refused to give to others.
            Amen.

Friday, January 15, 2021

An Earnest Pleading before Christ

This prayer, called an "Obsecration," is a pleading of God's mercy in the face of human sin. In the midst of a world bent on its own destruction, it is tempting to turn our backs in either indignation or disgust. Yet, the Christian faith embraces the Cross of Christ, and in so doing, intercedes for the world. Such pleading also confronts us with the truth of our own complicity, leading us to repentance and amendment of life. This prayer is especially suitable for Fridays throughout the year, as well as in Lent, Holy Week, and as an examination of conscience.

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Lord, by this sweet and saving Sign,

Defend us from our foes and thine.


Jesus, by thy wounded feet,

    Direct our paths aright:

Jesu, by thy nailed hands,

    Move ours to deeds of love:

Jesu, by thy pierced side,

    Cleanse our desires:

Jesu, by thy crown of thorns,

    Annihilate our pride:

Jesu, by thy parched lips,

    Curb our cruel speech:

Jesuby by thy closing eyes,

    Look on our sin no more:

Jesu, by thy broken heart,

    Knit ours to thee.


And by this sweet and saving Sign,

Lord, draw us to our peace and thine.


- Richard Crashaw, and others.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

St. Leo the Great on the Feast of the Epiphany


This excerpted sermon on the Epiphany by St. Leo the Great illustrates a number of features of classic Christian faith. It shows how deeply imbued with the Holy Scriptures all true teaching and preaching in the catholic faith must be. It delivers a message both of hope and of clear direction for how to savor this feast and how to apply it—in this case, by taking a lesson from the star that guides the Magi on their way, to help others come to their destination in God. It is a fine example of what faithful preaching has always been (and must always be), so human hearts may be nourished in the unique and joyful message of Salvation.

May your Epiphanytide celebrations continue the theme of joy and possibility begun at Christmas. Keep the whole season after Epiphany until Lent as a time of intentional thanksgiving for being led by faith into God's nearer presence while on earth and for the promise of meeting our Lord "face to face" at the end of the ages.

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The loving providence of God determined that in the last days he would aid the world, set on its course to destruction. He decreed that all nations should be saved in Christ.


A promise had been made to the holy patriarch Abraham in regard to these nations. He was to have a countless progeny, born not from his body but from the seed of faith. His descendants are therefore compared with the array of the stars. The father of all nations was to hope not in an earthly progeny but in a progeny from above.


Let the full number of the nations now take their place in the family of the patriarchs. Let the children of the promise now receive the blessing in the seed of Abraham, the blessing renounced by the children of his flesh. In the persons of the Magi let all people adore the Creator of the universe; let God be known, not in Judaea only, but in the whole world, so that his name may be great in all Israel.


Dear friends, now that we have received instruction in this revelation of God’s grace, let us celebrate with spiritual joy the day of our first harvesting, of the first calling of the Gentiles. Let us give thanks to the merciful God, who has made us worthy, in the words of the Apostle, to share the position of the saints in light, who has rescued us from the power of darkness, and brought us into the kingdom of his beloved Son. As Isaiah prophesied: the people of the Gentiles, who sat in darkness, have seen a great light, and for those who dwelt in the region of the shadow of death a light has dawned. He spoke of them to the Lord: The Gentiles, who do not know you, will invoke you, and the peoples, who knew you not, will take refuge in you.


This is the day that Abraham saw, and rejoiced to see, when he knew that the sons born of his faith would be blessed in his seed, that is, in Christ. Believing that he would be the father of the nations, he looked into the future, giving glory to God, in full awareness that God is able to do what he has promised.


This is the day that David prophesied in the psalms, when he said: All the nations that you have brought into being will come and fall down in adoration in your presence, Lord, and glorify your name. Again, the Lord has made known his salvation; in the sight of the nations he has revealed his justice.


This came to be fulfilled, as we know, from the time when the star beckoned the three wise men out of their distant country and led them to recognize and adore the King of heaven and earth. The obedience of the star calls us to imitate its humble service: to be servants, as best we can, of the grace that invites all men to find Christ.


Dear friends, you must have the same zeal to be of help to one another; then, in the kingdom of God, to which faith and good works are the way, you will shine as children of the light: through our Lord Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with God the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever. Amen.
from Sermo 3 in Epiphania Domini, 1-3. 5: PL 54, 240-244.
St. Leo (c. 400 AD - 461 AD) is commemorated on November 10th


The Collect of the Feast of the Epiphany of Our Lord Jesus Christ

O God, by the leading of a star you manifested your only Son to the peoples of the earth: Lead us, who know you now by faith, to your presence, where we may see your glory face to face; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Monday, January 4, 2021

Blessing your home this Epiphany


 

Epiphanytide Prayers 

for God’s Blessing on a Home

Also known as "Chalking the Doors" this service may be used during the first weeks of the New Year. Chalk is used, along with candles and holy water (obtainable through church).

 

[The electric lights are dimmed in the room where the opening section of the service is to be celebrated. Candles are lit and arranged on a table, around which participants stand. Holy water may be placed in a bowl or other container for use at the service’s conclusion.]

 

All: + In the Name of God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

Leader: Peace be to this house.

 

AllAnd to all who enter it in this year of God's favor and grace.

 

Leader: The Magi came from the East to worship the Lord Jesus.

 

All: And falling at his feet and beholding the radiance of his glory, the glory he had with the Father before the world began, they gave him precious gifts of mystic meaning.

 

Leader: They presented him with gold because he is the world's only true King, the one merciful Lord worthy of our gifts, our service and our vows. They blessed him with incense that sweet-smelling smoke might evermore rise up from our altars to the Throne of his majesty, worshipping and blessing and magnifying him, the one, true God. They offered him myrrh because it would soon anoint his immaculate body, preparing it for his burial.

 

A Reading from the Gospel according to Matthew: (2:1-12)

 

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, "Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage." When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, "In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet: And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd my people Israel.'" Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, "Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage." When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.

 

AllOur Father....

 

Leader: Gracious God, you revealed your Son to the nations by the brilliant Star of Bethlehem. O Uncreated Light, Morning-Star of Epiphany and the world's New Dawn, lead us, warm our hearts, fortify our wills, enkindle our devotion to you, enlighten and illumine our inward vision. Lead us, guide us all the days of our earthly pilgrimage until we are received into your glory. We implore your great mercy through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

[With chalk, the leader makes this inscription on the lintel of the main entrance: 20+C+M+B+21. The letters stand for the traditional names of the Magi: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar. The numbers are for the year of our Lord. If holy water is to be used, it is brought forth for use at this time. If holy water is not used, the bracketed portion of the following prayer is omitted.]

 

Leader: Eternal God, we ask that you send your blessing to be upon this home. [Let the sprinkling of this holy water recall for us the gift of baptism, our consecration to Christ's service. May it drive far from this house and all who enter it all snares and assaults of the enemy. Wherever this water is sprinkled may safety be guarded and hospitality be made manifest.] Grant that faith, charity, and good health triumph over evil in this house. May your Word always be cherished and obeyed here. We give praise and thanksgiving to you, and to your Son, and to the Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

[Holy water, in the sign of the cross, may be applied to the door. All may then bless themselves with holy water; holy water may be applied to the doorway of each room in the house; those present may sing appropriate Epiphanytide hymns as they move from room to room.]

Saturday, December 5, 2020

The O Antiphons: An Introduction

 


The Great “O” Antiphons

The Magnificat (also called “The Song of Mary”) from Luke 1:46-55 is sung or said every day at Evening Prayer (as the Benedictus, Zechariah’s song, is used with Morning Prayer and the Nunc dimittis, Simeon’s Song, at  Compline). It is customary to use short phrases, called “antiphons,” usually drawn from Scripture, before and after these canticles or songs. Antiphons change by season or special commemoration at each service. 

 

In the week before Christmas there is a special group of antiphons for use with the Magnificat at Evening Prayer. These antiphons all begin with “O” and have been collected together to form the words to Hymn 56, “O come, O come, Emmanuel.” Each verse of this hymn may be said as an antiphon to the Magnificat in the evening during the week before Christmas, in addition to its being sung as a hymn on its own. Many recordings of these antiphons in Latin and English are available online; the chants associated with them are often extremely beautiful.

The “O” antiphons, based mostly on prophesies from Isaiah, address the Messiah in various ways, focusing on his different attributes and gifts to us. Together, they form a rich array of images not only about Advent, but for how we live in Christian expectation throughout our lives.


December 17: O Wisdom, coming forth from the mouth of the Most High, reaching from one end to the other, mightily and sweetly ordering all things: Come and teach us the way of prudence. 


"The spirit of the Lord shall rest on him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord. His delight shall be in the fear of the Lord." Isaiah 11:2-3


"He is wonderful in counsel, and excellent in wisdom." Isaiah 28:29


December 18: O Adonai, and leader of the House of Israel, who appeared to Moses in the fire of the burning bush and gave him the law on Sinai: Come and redeem us with an outstretched arm.


“With righteousness he shall judge the poor, and decide with equity for the meek of the earth; he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked. Righteousness shall be the belt around his waist, and faithfulness the belt around his loins." Isaiah 11:4-5

 

"For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our ruler, the Lord is our king; he will save us." Isaiah 33:22


December 19: O Root of Jesse, standing as a sign among the peoples; before you kings will shut their mouths, to you the nations will make their prayer: Come and deliver us, and delay no longer.


"A shoot shall come out from the stock of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots." Isaiah 11:1


"On that day the root of Jesse shall stand as a signal to the peoples; the nations shall inquire of him, and his dwelling shall be glorious." Isaiah 11:10


December 20: O Key of David and scepter of the House of Israel; you open and no one can shut; you shut and no one can open: Come and lead the prisoners from the prison house, those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death.


"I will place on his shoulder the key of the house of David; he shall open, and no one shall shut; he shall shut, and no one shall open." Isaiah 22:22


"His authority shall grow continually, and there shall be endless peace for the throne of David and his kingdom. He will establish and uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time onwards and for evermore." Isaiah 9:7


"To open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison, and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house." Isaiah 42:7.


December 21: O Morning Star, splendor of light eternal and sun of righteousness: Come and enlighten those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death. 


"The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who lived in a land of deep darkness—on them light has shined." Isaiah 9:2


December 22: O King of the nations, and their desire, the cornerstone making both one: Come and save the human race, which you fashioned from clay.


"For a child has been born for us, a son given us; authority rests upon his shoulders; and he is named Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace." Isaiah 9:6


"He shall judge between the nations, and shall arbitrate for many peoples; they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore." Isaiah 2:4


"But now, O LORD, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand. Isaiah 64:8


December 23: O Emmanuel, our king and our lawgiver, the hope of the nations and their Savior: Come and save us, O Lord our God.


"Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Look, the young woman is with child and shall bear a son, and shall name him Emmanuel." Isaiah 7:14


These antiphons have been arranged as an Advent litany in the revised edition of The St. Augustine’s Prayer Book, suitable for use each day in Advent as a way to focus our prayers to God for renewed hope and faith during this season. This litany is available on Fr. Brandon’s blog, as well.

Wednesday, December 2, 2020

A Litany for Advent


Below is a litany for use during the Advent season. It is based on the "Great O Antiphons" used before and after the Magnificat at Evening Prayer in the week prior to Christmas, which are themselves based on various passages of the Old Testament which the Church has seen as prophetic of Christ's coming. This litany (and the prayers following it) may be used at morning, noon, or evening prayers, or as a way to meditate on the message of the Advent season at another time, such as a Quiet Day or a retreat.

X  X  X

O Wisdom, proceeding from the Most High, reaching from one end to another, mightily and sweetly ordering all things: 

Come and teach us the way of understanding.

O Adonai and Leader of the House of Israel, who appeared to Moses in the burning bush and on Mount Sinai gave the Law: 

Come to deliver us with your strong arm.

O Root of Jesse, given as a sign for all peoples, in whose presence kings are silenced and before whom all nations will be judged: 

Come with the day of peace and do not delay.

O Key of David, who opens and none can shut, leading us to life everlasting: 

Come and lead out those bound in chains.

O Day Spring, the bright and morning star, the eternal light that enlightens all: 

Come and shine on those who sit in darkness and the shadow of death.

O King of the Nations, chosen and precious cornerstone, binding in one all peoples: 

Come quiet the strife that afflicts your children.

O Emmanuel, the promise and the fulfillment of all promises: 

Come and bring among us the joy of your kingdom.

Even so, Lord Jesus, quickly come. Amen.

One of these prayers may then conclude the litany.

Make us watchful and alert, O Lord our God, that when he comes, your Son Christ our Lord will not find us sleeping in sin or distracted with fears, but awake, strong in faith, active in service, and rejoicing in your praises, through the same Jesus Christ our Lord.Amen.

May Christ, whose second coming in power and great glory we await, X make us steadfast in faith, joyful in hope, and constant in love. Amen.

Stir up your power, O Lord, and with great might come among us; and, because we are sorely hindered by our sins, let your bountiful grace and mercy speedily help and deliver us; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit, be honor and glory, now and for ever. Amen.

Purify our conscience, Almighty God, by your daily visitation, that your Son Jesus Christ, at his coming, may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

The year declines and our days draw to a close: let us, for it is time, amend our doings to the praise of Christ; let our lamps be burning, for the exalted Judge cometh to judge the nations. Amen.

Lord, you have set before us the great hope that your kingdom shall come on earth, and have taught us to pray for its coming; give us grace to discern the signs of its dawning, and to work for the perfect day when your will shall be done on earth as it is in heaven; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

From The St. Augustine’s Prayer Book,
Revised Edition

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Remembering our Citizenship

A Word from the Rector...


I've been through quite a few elections now as a parish priest--both secular and ecclesiastical--and through them all, certain things stay constant. One is the tenderness following a vote. In our way of doing things, some must win and some must lose. Being on the losing side can be very painful, especially if we believe only that side possesses the truth. Another is the tendency for those who "won" to forget the Golden Rule and act with swagger and certitude. 

My advice to all is to remember a verse from sacred scripture (Philippians 3:20, to be exact): But our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. 

St. Paul's words here remind us that our deepest identity is found in our membership in Christ's body, and through this body, in God's Kingdom of Love. That citizenship is secure and enduring.

While we work to proclaim God's kingdom here, and labor to fulfill our commission as ministers of His mercy and justice, we must not allow ourselves--however gradually or imperceptibly--to substitute an earthly counterfeit for our heavenly citizenship. Our earthly citizenship is passing, frequently incomplete, and involves us in much sin and tumult; our heavenly citizenship is the source of our hope, our peace, and our triumph.

No matter which "side" we found ourselves on Election Day, our real allegiance should be to Christ, whose perfect will and peace is only imperfectly known in the things of human governance. As we go forward from this week, let us bear this in mind with regard to our neighbor and (especially) with regard to our fellow parishioners, together with whom we have won over the forces of death and division through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Brandon+

A Prayer for the Election

Almighty God, to whom we must account for all our powers and privileges:  Guide the people of the United States in the completion of this election of officials and representatives; that, by faithful administration and wise laws, the rights of all may be protected and our nation be enabled to fulfill your purposes; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

A Prayer for those who Influence Public Opinion

Almighty God, you proclaim your truth in every age by many voices: Direct, in our time, we pray, those who speak where many listen and write what many read; that they may do their part in making the heart of this people wise, its mind sound, and its will righteous; to the honor of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.